This page showcases an extensive gallery of biocultural diversity conservation projects from all over the world: projects that take an integrative and synergistic approach to conserving nature and strengthening and revitalizing local cultures and languages. It is a “living resource” for everyone interested in biocultural diversity.

The first 45 projects come from our book Biocultural Diversity Conservation: A Global Sourcebook. We identified these projects through a worldwide survey, and described and analyzed them in the book. Here, you’ll find the project descriptions, in the words of the people who contributed them.

Caring for Country: Transmission of Aboriginal Environmental Knowledge in Western Australia

Project Contributor: Kimberley Language Resource Centre Aboriginal Corporation Barbara Sturt and Bonnie Marisha Sampi with Barndu (water goanna) and Jalij (freshwater prawn) Credit: Kimberley Language Resource Centre The Kimberley region of Western Australia is one of the most linguistically diverse areas of Australia. At least 42 languages, plus dialects, were identified post-colonisation. According

Supporting Traditional Health Practices in Urban Areas: Indigenous Theory for First Nations Health in Canada

The dissertation project “Indigenous Theory for Health: Enhancing Traditional-Based Indigenous Health Services in Vancouver”, completed in 2005, was supported by the University of British Columbia and by grants from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR)-funded BC Aboriginal Capacity and Developmental Research Environment (BC ACADRE). It was developed from the informal recommendations of traditional Indigenous

Combining Environmental Stewardship and Economic Renewal in Northern Canada: The Whitefeather Forest Initiative

Project Contributors: Alex Peters, Andrew Chapeskie website: www.whitefeatherforest.com Preparing fish in Pikangikum: people are moulded by the land and everything they draw from it, say the Elders Credit: Whitefeather Forest Initiative The Whitefeather Forest planning area, located in the boreal region of Ontario and Manitoba, Canada, is a holistic network of both natural

A “Life Plan” for the Park: Culturally Appropriate Management in Brazil’s Xingu Indigenous Park

Project Contributor: Darron Collins Mapping traditional territories in the Xingu Indigenous Park. Credit: Amazon Conservation Team The concept of “National Park” in Brazil incorporates the dual objectives of protecting the environment and the indigenous populations living within its boundaries. Parks are administered by the National Indian Foundation (known in Brazil as FUNAI) and