Projects

This page showcases an extensive gallery of biocultural diversity conservation projects from all over the world: projects that take an integrative and synergistic approach to conserving nature and strengthening and revitalizing local cultures and languages. It is a “living resource” for everyone interested in biocultural diversity.

The first 45 projects come from our book Biocultural Diversity Conservation: A Global Sourcebook. We identified these projects through a worldwide survey, and described and analyzed them in the book. Here, you’ll find the project descriptions, in the words of the people who contributed them.

Caring for Country: Transmission of Aboriginal Environmental Knowledge in Western Australia

Project Contributor: Kimberley Language Resource Centre Aboriginal Corporation Barbara Sturt and Bonnie Marisha Sampi with Barndu (water goanna) and Jalij (freshwater prawn) Credit: Kimberley Language Resource Centre The Kimberley region of Western Australia is one of the most linguistically diverse areas of Australia. At least 42 languages, plus dialects, were identified post-colonisation. According

Learning That Wisdom Sits In Places: Apache Students Reconnecting To Land and Identity In Arizona, US

Project Contributors: Jonathan Long and Judy DeHose Apache students identifying plants at Goshtlish Tú Bil Sikané Credit: Julee DeHose Over three decades ago years ago, nearly 300 places of cultural importance to the Apache people in the valleys surrounding Cibecue, Arizona were mapped and photographed by anthropologist Keith Basso with the help of

Supporting Traditional Health Practices in Urban Areas: Indigenous Theory for First Nations Health in Canada

The dissertation project “Indigenous Theory for Health: Enhancing Traditional-Based Indigenous Health Services in Vancouver”, completed in 2005, was supported by the University of British Columbia and by grants from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR)-funded BC Aboriginal Capacity and Developmental Research Environment (BC ACADRE). It was developed from the informal recommendations of traditional Indigenous

Recovering the Connection between People and the Environment through Ancestral Law in British Columbia, Canada

Project Contributor: Patricia Vickers The Nisga’a People of the Nass River have lived on the northwest coast of British Columbia, Canada for generations – long enough for a culture to thrive, adapt, and endure. For the Nisga’a Nation, the meaning of the relationship between people and the environment is found in metaphor and stories. This

Traditional Knowledge for Sustainability: Land use Planning among the Gitxaala of British Columbia, Canada

Project Contributor: Charles Menzies For many generations, the Gitxaala people have lived in their territories along the north coast of what is now British Columbia, Canada. Gitxaala laws (Ayawwk) and history (Adaawk) describe in precise detail the relationships of trust, honour and respect that are appropriate for the well-being and continuance of the people, and

Combining Environmental Stewardship and Economic Renewal in Northern Canada: The Whitefeather Forest Initiative

Project Contributors: Alex Peters, Andrew Chapeskie website: www.whitefeatherforest.com Preparing fish in Pikangikum: people are moulded by the land and everything they draw from it, say the Elders Credit: Whitefeather Forest Initiative The Whitefeather Forest planning area, located in the boreal region of Ontario and Manitoba, Canada, is a holistic network of both natural

Re-establishing the inextricable link: Mbyá culture and biological diversity in the Atlantic Rainforest in Southeast Brazil

Project Contributors: Márcia Gomes de Oliveira and Norbert Suchanek The Mbyá are one of the last surviving indigenous peoples of the Atlantic Rainforest in the Southeast of Brazil, known as Mata Atlântica, which once covered part of Paraguay, Uruguay, the North of Argentina and the whole coastal areas all the way to the Brazilian Northeast.

Training Indigenous Agro-Forestry Agents in Acre, Brazil: Indigenous and Modern Technologies for Sustainability

Project Contributors: Giulia Pedone, Renato Gavazzi The Kaxinawá people of Acre, Brazil Credit: CPI/Ac archives The Amazon region has largely been perceived as a boundless territory with unlimited resources to exploit. Due to its low population density, it has been viewed as an “empty space” to be colonized and to be integrated into

Protection of an Indigenous Reserve: the Ka’apor People of Amazonian Brazil

Project Contributor: William Balée The Ka’apor emerged as a people with a distinctive identity about three hundred years ago, probably between the Tocantins and Xingu Rivers in the Amazon Basin. They later engaged in a long and slow migration that took them into Maranhão State, in eastern Amazonian Brazil, by the 1870s. One hundred years

A “Life Plan” for the Park: Culturally Appropriate Management in Brazil’s Xingu Indigenous Park

Project Contributor: Darron Collins Mapping traditional territories in the Xingu Indigenous Park. Credit: Amazon Conservation Team The concept of “National Park” in Brazil incorporates the dual objectives of protecting the environment and the indigenous populations living within its boundaries. Parks are administered by the National Indian Foundation (known in Brazil as FUNAI) and

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