This page showcases an extensive gallery of biocultural diversity conservation projects from all over the world: projects that take an integrative and synergistic approach to conserving nature and strengthening and revitalizing local cultures and languages. It is a “living resource” for everyone interested in biocultural diversity.

The first 45 projects come from our book Biocultural Diversity Conservation: A Global Sourcebook. We identified these projects through a worldwide survey, and described and analyzed them in the book. Here, you’ll find the project descriptions, in the words of the people who contributed them.

Tools for Biocultural Diversity Conservation: Community Mapping of Indigenous Peoples’ Traditional Lands in Venezuela

Project Contributor: Stanford Zent Hotï people drying cane for blowguns Credit: Stanford Zent In 1999, the national constitution of Venezuela gave explicit recognition to the land rights and cultural rights of the country’s indigenous peoples. Following passage of the new constitution and subsequent demarcation laws, several indigenous groups began taking the initiative to

Reviving Traditional Seed Exchange and Cultural Knowledge in Rural Costa Rica

Project Contributor: Felipe Montoya Greenheck In Costa Rica, agrobiodiversity has been lost because of market pressures on agricultural production. The demand for high-volume, standardized production has been a disincentive for the continued cultivation of low-yield traditional seeds, even though the traditional varieties have for generations been selected for their higher nutritional value and their adaptations

Traditional Textiles of Cusco: Weaving Heritage

Project Contributor: Nilda Callañaupa The group of weavers working in Chinchero in April, 2007. This group has only gotten bigger since this photo was taken. The Center of Traditional Textiles of the Cusco (CTTC) was founded in 1996, when the textile traditions in the Cusco Region of the Andes, based in the ancient

Worlds of Difference: Local Culture in a Global Age

Project Contributor: Jonathan Miller Peruvian biologist María Scurrah learning the names of traditional potato varieties from a farmer in Quilcas, Junín Department, Peru. Credit: Jonathan Miller Homeland Productions (http://homelands.org) is an independent, non-profit journalism cooperative in Tucson, Arizona, USA, specializing in radio documentaries. Its mission is to illuminate complex issues through compelling broadcasts,