Projects

This page showcases an extensive gallery of biocultural diversity conservation projects from all over the world: projects that take an integrative and synergistic approach to conserving nature and strengthening and revitalizing local cultures and languages. It is a “living resource” for everyone interested in biocultural diversity.

The first 45 projects come from our book Biocultural Diversity Conservation: A Global Sourcebook. We identified these projects through a worldwide survey, and described and analyzed them in the book. Here, you’ll find the project descriptions, in the words of the people who contributed them.

Working with Traditional Knowledge in Land Use Planning: Gwich’in Place Names, Land Uses, and Heritage Sites in the Northern Territories of Canada

Project Contributor: Ingrid Kritsch Hills at Tl’oondih where summer and winter trails led to traditional Gwich’in hunting grounds in the Yukon, and a clearing where one Gwich’in elder had his camp. Credit: Ingrid Kritsch, GSC The Gwich’in are one of the most northerly aboriginal peoples on the North American continent, living at the

Promoting Traditional Medicine, Indigenous Cultural Research, and African Spirituality in Uganda

Project Contributor: Sekagya Yahaya Hill Traditional Healing Centre, Uganda Credit: THETA News The traditional African culture that acted as a social security system for the weaker sectors of society has greatly eroded. In Uganda, the use of herbal medicine was labelled as “backward, uncivilized and unholy” during the colonial era, and traditional healers

Talking the Walk in Tanzania: Language as the Missing Ingredient of Biodiversity Conservation?

Project Contributor: Samantha Ross A Women’s Focus Group Discussing Changes in Plant Abundance in Goka, Tanzania. Credit: Samantha Ross The Eastern Arc Mountain Chain in Tanzania is one of the 33 global biodiversity hotspots and provides an ideal opportunity to study biological and linguistic diversity. The range spreads from Southern Kenya to Southern

Countering Local Knowledge Loss and Landrace Extinction in Kenya: The Case of the Bottle Gourd (Lagenaria siceraria)

Project Contributor: Yasuyuki Morimoto Women displaying kitete gourds and kitete seed necklaces at community festival Credit: Yasuyuki Morimoto/Bioversity International For the Kamba people in the Kitui District of Kenya, the bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) and its estimated 50 landraces are part of a rich cultural history, having been cultivated for approximately 10,000 years.

Biodiversity Conservation Through Traditional Practices in Southwestern Ethiopia, a Hotspot of Biocultural Diversity

Project Contributor: Zerihun Woldu The southern Rift Valley in Southwestern Ethiopia is known as one of the hotspots of biocultural diversity and of indigenous knowledge associated with the use and conservation of biodiversity through home gardens, agroforestry practices, and sacred forests. The project “Ethnobotany of Indigenous People of the Southern Rift Valley and Southwestern Ethiopia”

Indigenous Sacred Sites and Biocultural Diversity: A Case Study from Southwestern Ethiopia

Project Contributor: Desalegn Desissa Community gathering in the Dorbo sacred pasture land to get blessing from indigenous religious leaders (sitting in the front row) Credit: Desalegn Desissa Sacred lands in southwestern Ethiopia are in distress, due to the lack of respect for indigenous spirituality and the failure of the local government bodies to protect its

Wild Resources and Cultural Values: Implications for Biocultural Diversity in South Africa

Project Contributor: Michelle Cocks The woodpile is the Xhosa women's status symbol and cultural totem. Photo: Tony Dold Since the 1980s, the government of South Africa has taken a more people-centred approach to conservation, and most legislation has been updated to articulate the need for the participation of local people in the management of biodiversity

Translate »