The Kala Vernacular Education and Local Ecological Knowledge Project

Project Contributers: Christine Schreyer and John Wagner Tusi Nandang (on the right), research assistant, practicing his interviewing skills with Mathias Dagam. Tusi Nandang (on the right), research assistant, practicing his interviewing skills with Mathias Dagam. Kala is a language with four distinct dialects spoken by approximately 2000 individuals in six villages (from north

Teaching and Learning from an Indigenous Perspective: Knowledge and Language Revitalization in Hawaii

Project Contributor: Chad Kälepa Baybayan A consortium of Native Hawaiian schools and education professionals is using the indigenous Hawaiian language as a medium for making connections between traditional and formal scientific knowledge within a Hawaiian paradigm – one that is grounded in practices that allow people to be self-sufficient by sustaining the environments that feed

Reconnecting with Natural and Cultural Heritage: Flora and Fauna of the Marshall Islands

Project Contributor: Nancy Vander Velde with Jorelik Tibon In the Marshall Islands in the Pacific, as is occurring in many other areas of the world, traditional lifestyles are being replaced by urbanized ones. This transformation, compounded by the occurrence of invasive species and other non-native species, is resulting in disconnection from local biodiverse surroundings. Much

Taboos and Conservation: Traditional Conservation Sites in the Marshall Islands

Project Contributor: Nancy Vander Velde with Jorelik Tibon In previous times, tribal chiefs could designate an island, a section of land or reef as being mo, or “taboo”. These areas were off-limits to people in general, being reserved for only certain personages and purposes. As in other countries, however, changes in biodiversity and culture have

Integrating Customary Tenure Systems in Marine Protected Areas: A Solomon Islands Example

Project Contributor: Shankar Aswani Men involved in participatory mapping exercise in Roviana, Solomon Islands Credit: Shankar Aswani Protected areas presently cover less than 0.5% of the land and seascapes of the Solomon Islands. In part, this is because Solomon Islands legislation lacks specific and appropriate provisions for creating protected areas, but the creation

Countering Fish Stock Depletion through Traditional Knowledge, Tenure, and Use of Marine Resources in Papua New Guinea

Project Contributors: Martha Macintyre, Simon Foale Fish stocks around Lihir Island in PNG are threatened by over-harvesting, as determined by research conducted by Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization. There is a real need to understand current and projected use of near-shore fishery resources in the context of rapid social and economic changes driven

Mining and Cultural Loss: Assessing and Mitigating Impacts in Papua New Guinea

Project Contributors: Martha Macintyre, Simon Foale Kinami Mountain on Lihir Island, PNG. Credit: Simon Foale Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea (PNG) is a site for gold mining by a large multinational company – Lihir Gold Limited (LGL), which is projected to be operating for thirty-five years. The mining involves open pit extraction with

Putting Australian Aboriginal Cultural Values on the Map: The Wet Tropics World Heritage Area as a Biocultural Landscape

Project Contributor: Bruce White The project “Mapping Aboriginal Cultural Values in the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area” was originally supported by the Aboriginal Rainforest Council Inc. (ARC), and is now supported by The Aboriginal Rainforest Advisory Committee, which comes under the Wet Tropics Management Authority, as well as the Queensland Natural Resource Management Ltd. The

Integrating Local and Scientific Knowledge: The Wik, Wik-Way & Kugu Ethnobiology Project in Queensland, Australia

Project Contributor: Sarah Edwards Dramatic changes to Aboriginal societies in Australia, which started with European colonization over 200 years ago and led to severe cultural erosion and the extinction of many Aboriginal languages, continue today with globalization. Environmental degradation, as a result of ranching, mining, and the influx of feral animals and invasive species, is

Bridging the (Digital) Gap: Aboriginal and Scientific Knowledge of Biodiversity in Northern Australia

Project Contributors: Helen Verran, David Turnbull Several groups of Australian Aboriginal Peoples are seeking ways to use digital technology (computers, digital cameras, sound recordings), in particular contexts, to keep their own languages and ecological knowledge systems strong. The project “Biocultural Diversity: Elaborating Theoretical Issues for Communities and Policy Makers” is one of several related projects