Category Page: Conserving BCD

Learning That Wisdom Sits In Places: Apache Students Reconnecting To Land and Identity In Arizona, US

Project Contributors: Jonathan Long and Judy DeHose Over three decades ago years ago, nearly 300 places of cultural importance to the Apache people in the valleys surrounding Cibecue, Arizona were mapped and photographed by anthropologist Keith Basso with the help of Apache tribal elders. The results were published by Basso in 1996, in a book

Talking the Walk in Tanzania: Language as the Missing Ingredient of Biodiversity Conservation?

Project Contributor: Samantha Ross The Eastern Arc Mountain Chain in Tanzania is one of the 33 global biodiversity hotspots and provides an ideal opportunity to study biological and linguistic diversity. The range spreads from Southern Kenya to Southern Tanzania and was formed as the Rift Valley took shape creating isolated mountainous blocks replete with unique

Recovering Landscape Health and Cultural Resilience in the Sierra Tarahumara, Mexico

The Rarámuri people (also known as Tarahumara by non-Rarámuri) are an indigenous group living in the Sierra Tarahumara, a part of the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua. This region of high sierras and deep canyons boasts an exceptional ecological diversity, and is home to some of the most

Caring for Country: Transmission of Aboriginal Environmental Knowledge in Western Australia

Project Contributor: Kimberley Language Resource Centre Aboriginal Corporation The Kimberley region of Western Australia is one of the most linguistically diverse areas of Australia. At least 42 languages, plus dialects, were identified post-colonisation. According to 2009 data from the Kimberley Development Commission (http://www.kdc.wa.gov.au), Aboriginal people form almost 48% of the population of the region, or

Promoting Traditional Medicine, Indigenous Cultural Research, and African Spirituality in Uganda

Project Contributor: Sekagya Yahaya Hill The traditional African culture that acted as a social security system for the weaker sectors of society has greatly eroded. In Uganda, the use of herbal medicine was labelled as “backward, uncivilized and unholy” during the colonial era, and traditional healers suffered much humiliation. However, the knowledge of herbal medicine

Strengthening Indigenous Cultural Heritage through Capacity Building in Costa Rica

Project Contributors: Hugh Govan with Rigoberto Carrera There are eight indigenous groups in Costa Rica, numbering some 63,800 people, which comprise 1.7% of the national population. Half of them are now settled in 24 reservations or territories, which cover an area of approximately 325,470ha or 6.3% of Costa Rica. The indigenous groups are: the Cabécar,

Bridging the (Digital) Gap: Aboriginal and Scientific Knowledge of Biodiversity in Northern Australia

Project Contributors: Helen Verran, David Turnbull Several groups of Australian Aboriginal Peoples are seeking ways to use digital technology (computers, digital cameras, sound recordings), in particular contexts, to keep their own languages and ecological knowledge systems strong. The project “Biocultural Diversity: Elaborating Theoretical Issues for Communities and Policy Makers” is one of several related projects

Working with Traditional Knowledge in Land Use Planning: Gwich’in Place Names, Land Uses, and Heritage Sites in the Northern Territories of Canada

Project Contributor: Ingrid Kritsch The Gwich’in are one of the most northerly aboriginal peoples on the North American continent, living at the northwestern limits of the boreal forest. Many families still maintain summer and winter camps outside their communities. Hunting, fishing and trapping remain important both culturally and economically, with caribou, moose and whitefish being

Reviving Traditional Seed Exchange and Cultural Knowledge in Rural Costa Rica

Project Contributor: Felipe Montoya Greenheck In Costa Rica, agrobiodiversity has been lost because of market pressures on agricultural production. The demand for high-volume, standardized production has been a disincentive for the continued cultivation of low-yield traditional seeds, even though the traditional varieties have for generations been selected for their higher nutritional value and their adaptations

Integrating Local and Scientific Knowledge: The Wik, Wik-Way & Kugu Ethnobiology Project in Queensland, Australia

Project Contributor: Sarah Edwards Dramatic changes to Aboriginal societies in Australia, which started with European colonization over 200 years ago and led to severe cultural erosion and the extinction of many Aboriginal languages, continue today with globalization. Environmental degradation, as a result of ranching, mining, and the influx of feral animals and invasive species, is