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Ruma Umari, a Wanang paraecologist and entomologist, rearing insects from fruits gathered from the Wanang Conservation Area. Photo: Binatang Research Centre

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Budhiram Tai, the Gaon-Burrah (village head) of Darlong, holds an artificial byopa (traditional headgear worn by Nyishi men). A byopa used to be carved out of the great hornbill’s casque until the Wildlife Trust of India popularized the artificial variety.

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Wreathed hornbills fly across the hillsides of Darlong village.

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The dense tropical rainforest of Pakke Tiger Reserve, as seen from a vantage point on the way to the Dikhroi anti-poaching camp.

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Rasham Brah of Darlong village, his wife Devi Brah, and a village child gathered around a traditional hearth. Such a traditional kitchen, with its central open oven, is a mainstay of Nyishi identity.

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Courting wreathed hornbill pair photographed within Pakke Tiger Reserve.

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Rasham Brah walks with Bokunto, an orphaned elephant calf, along the Lalling River inside Pakke Tiger Reserve.

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The talons of a crested serpent eagle hangs from the wooden ceiling of Nyubu Hissang’s namlo (traditional Nyishi house).

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Tajik Tachang, a local project coordinator of the Hornbill Nest Adoption Project, jokingly mentions how his son, Michael, aspires to be a hornbill when he grows up.

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Late Hissang, the Nyubu (Nyishi priest), fans himself with the feathers of a crested serpent eagle. He wears a byopa on his head and his machete is hilted with the teeth set of a clouded leopard. (Rasham Brah reads in the background.)