Tag

Speaking Our Identity

El Molo

Story by Hellen Losapicho, age 34, El Molo (Kenya), and Magella Hassan Lenatiyama, age 35, El Molo (Kenya) The last fluent speaker of our language, El Molo, died in 1999, and it is now one of the most endangered languages in the world. When the Samburu people moved into our territories after an outbreak of

My Missing Tongue

Indigenous Languages

Story by Abraham Ofori-Henaku, age 21, Akan (Ghana) . It’s been quite a long journey growing up in a society that very much holds on to its rich way of life — something that I always took for granted. And now, it’s all coming back to me in regret. Oh! Pardon me! Where are my manners? Hi there!

They call me Umusangwabutaka: My People Were the First to Reach This Land, but Today We Don’t Own Any of It

biocultural diversity

Story by Marie Michelle Hirwa, Batwa (Rwanda) I am Marie Michelle Hirwa, born on September 12, 1986. I was born into a family of seven children in the Kacyiru commune, now called Gasabo, in Kigali, the capital of Rwanda. Both my mum and dad passed away when I was 9 years old. Most of my

Ewaso Ng’iro Camel Caravan

biocultural diversity

Video and text by Laissa Malih (Kenyan Laikipian Maasai), age 25 The Ewaso Ng’iro Camel Caravan is a five-day annual journey for climate change adaptation and peaceful co-existence along the Ewaso Ng’iro River in Kenya. The purpose is to promote shared understanding of threats facing the river, along with the cooperation needed to lessen them. Camels are used

Lessons of the Maasai Warriors (Morani)

Indigenous Languages

Story by Edna Kilusu (Tanzanian Maasai), age 19   “Do not come back after I lock the door,” my mother says, warning me not to be late returning tonight. While she milks the cows, I quickly build the fire and ensure that it is ready for making ugali, an everyday meal of corn flour and water

Orpul as a Place of Mind: Integrating Local Ritual into School Curriculum to Sustain Biocultural Diversity in Tanzania

biocultural diversity

by Heidi Simper “A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin, and culture is like a tree without roots.” –Marcus Garvey During the rainy season in the bush of the Great African Rift Valley in Eastern Tanzania, amid Maasai culture, acacia trees, and cries of hyenas in the night, I was conducting my

Indigenous Sacred Sites and Biocultural Diversity: A Case Study from Southwestern Ethiopia

Project Contributor: Desalegn Desissa Community gathering in the Dorbo sacred pasture land to get blessing from indigenous religious leaders (sitting in the front row) Credit: Desalegn Desissa Sacred lands in southwestern Ethiopia are in distress, due to the lack of respect for indigenous spirituality and the failure of the local government bodies to protect its

Biodiversity Conservation Through Traditional Practices in Southwestern Ethiopia, a Hotspot of Biocultural Diversity

Project Contributor: Zerihun Woldu The southern Rift Valley in Southwestern Ethiopia is known as one of the hotspots of biocultural diversity and of indigenous knowledge associated with the use and conservation of biodiversity through home gardens, agroforestry practices, and sacred forests. The project “Ethnobotany of Indigenous People of the Southern Rift Valley and Southwestern Ethiopia”

Countering Local Knowledge Loss and Landrace Extinction in Kenya: The Case of the Bottle Gourd (Lagenaria siceraria)

Project Contributor: Yasuyuki Morimoto For the Kamba people in the Kitui District of Kenya, the bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) and its estimated 50 landraces are part of a rich cultural history, having been cultivated for approximately 10,000 years. Known locally as kitete, this plant is central to the material culture of the region and has

Talking the Walk in Tanzania: Language as the Missing Ingredient of Biodiversity Conservation?

Project Contributor: Samantha Ross The Eastern Arc Mountain Chain in Tanzania is one of the 33 global biodiversity hotspots and provides an ideal opportunity to study biological and linguistic diversity. The range spreads from Southern Kenya to Southern Tanzania and was formed as the Rift Valley took shape creating isolated mountainous blocks replete with unique

  • 1
  • 2