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People and Plants: Sustaining Agrobiodiversity through Art and Science in Zimbabwe

Ms. Mai Biggie

Text, photos, and drawings by Saori Ogura . Dawn in the village. As the Milky Way—gwararakurumvi—recedes from a sky of deep navy blue, birds start to fly over the fields, espying millet and sorghum. The sun orb pierces the horizon and moves midheavenward. It’s March 2016, and I am a guest in the traditional chiefdom

Voices from the Field: African Rural Women, Custodians of Seed and Traditional Knowledge

Kagole Byarufu

by Kagole Margret Byarufu My name, Kagole, was given to me upon my birth. It initially belonged to my father’s aunt who had died a few months before I was born. She was herself a custodian of the sacred natural site cared for by my family, so the other members of my clan in the

De Prima: Stories of the Old Days in Umbria, the Green Heart of Italy

biodiversity

by Anna Maffi . . Olives, grapes, barley, alfalfa, and a few fruit trees are the main crops grown in the valley of San Giacomo, a tiny rural hamlet of perhaps fifty souls in Umbria, the green heart of Italy. Its dwellers consider the valley “golden” for its fertility. South-facing exposure, sandy loams, and relative

Isafarn Nudrar: Flowerpots Help Preserve Biocultural Diversity in the High Atlas, Morocco

medicinal plants

by Irene Teixidor Toneu Isafarn nudrar means “medicinal plants from the mountains” in Tashelhit, one of the three Berber languages spoken in Morocco. Recently, in collaboration with the Global Diversity Foundation, I spent six months documenting medicinal plant use in the High Atlas and understanding the environmental and cultural landscapes in which plants are used.

Fostering Well-being Through Biocultural Diversity: The Las Nubes Project in a Biological Corridor in Southern Costa Rica

biocultural diversity

by Felipe Montoya-Greenheck . Throughout history, peasants around the world have faced the threats of empire, urban expansion and the lure of urban opportunities, over-taxation, and both abandonment and persecution by the state. In our generation, they have also been confronted with dispossession by the corporate machinery, lubricated by neo-liberal international agreements favoring free trade.

Traditional Treasure: Local Knowledge for Climate Change Adaptation in Bangkukuk Taik, Nicaragua

biocultural diversity

by Marie Besses and Martina Luger It’s 7 a.m., still early enough to leave Bluefields with a panga (skiff boat). The captain is watching the sky with a little concern. A gentle breeze is blowing, and it’s important to leave early before the wind stirs up the sea causing large waves. It takes two hours

Culturally-Mediated Disturbance: Building a Bridge Between Knowledge Systems to Conserve Biocultural Diversity in New Guinea

Hewa traditions

by William H. Thomas Buried deep within the Western psyche rests a romantic myth that neither evidence nor exposure has been able to extinguish—the Noble Savage. Although it no longer has scientific currency, the idea that traditional societies uncorrupted by civilization are able to live in balance with their surroundings continues to subtly permeate the