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Hvala – Thank You: A Meditation on Reclaiming My Croatian Heritage

Sylvia Pozeg About the Artwork My painting was created in gratitude to Croatia and as a meditation on reclaiming my heritage, from my own personal connection; no longer filtered through hazy childhood memories, not assimilated into some synthetic norm. I finally got to feel the storied land that shaped my ancestors, as strangely familiar as

Ainbon Jakon Joi: The Good Word of an Indigenous Woman

Chonon Bensho with Pedro Favaron When I was born, my parents registered my birth in the town of Yarinacocha, giving me the name Astrith Gonzales Agustín. But in Shipibo-Konibo, my mother tongue, my name is Chonon Bensho, which means “the swallow from medicine orchards.” I am heir to the knowledge of my ancestors. My husband’s

I Want to Keep the Past and Bring It into the Future

Indigenous youth

Vova Iadne (Nenets, Russian Federation), interviewed by Galya Morrell I started carving when I was five. But even before that, I saw mammoth tusks in our Nenets tundra and played with them: they were my toys. I watched my father carving. I saw plain bones magically transforming into animals, humans, and spirits. I was intrigued

There Are No Corners in the Tundra

Indigenous youth

Khadry Okotetto (Nenets, Russian Federation), interviewed by Galya Morrell I was born in the tundra and grew up with the animals. My first language was the language of reindeer and of Arctic birds. I was raised by my grandparents, like everybody else here. I was a lucky guy. As an artist, I see my main mission

Dreaming of a Beautiful World Where I Could Live One Day

Indigenous youth

Katrina Trofimova (Even, Russian Federation), interviewed by Galya Morrell For me, art is a mere instrument of survival. I was born in an Arctic village, where fathers and brothers were vanishing faster than ice. I was running away from violence, hiding in nature, and dreaming of a beautiful world where I could live one day.

TEKS | Promoting & Safeguarding Biocultural Diversity through the Arts

by Dely Roy Nalo and Thomas Dick Traditional: Habits and ways built over the years that are flexible and change in relation to new circumstances and situations Entertainment: An opportunity for the people to express and adjust, to adapt, safeguard kastom music and acts using contemporary arts in the face of overwhelming foreign influences Kastom

On Being a Chain Link Toward a Stronger Future: An Interview with Skil Jaadee White (Haida, age 24)

Haida

Interview by Luisa Maffi, Editor of Langscape Magazine, Co-founder and Director, Terralingua In June of 2019, I was very fortunate to attend a unique event: the HELISET TŦE SḰÁL “Let the Languages Live” conference in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (June 24–26, 2019). Organized by the First Peoples’ Cultural Council and the First Peoples’ Cultural Foundation,

Photo Gallery: Tsurushibina

Photos and artwork by Mariia Ermilova . . . . . . . . . This photo gallery is an extension of the full story about tsurushibina. . Back to Vol. 6, Issue 2 | Read the Table of Contents | Like Our Stories? Please Donate!   Mariia Ermilova is pursuing a PhD degree in Landscape Planning at Chiba University’s

Tsurushibina: A Traditional Japanese Craft Helps Maintain and Restore Biocultural Knowledge and People’s Connection with Nature

Text, photos, and artwork by Mariia Ermilova “Nature is painting for us, day after day, pictures of infinite beauty if only we have the eyes to see them.”   — John Ruskin . I want to tell you the story of a Japanese craft that impressed me for its deep connection with the culture and customs of the people.

One Square Meter: Wool Art Honors the Biocultural Diversity of Mobile Pastoralists

needle-felting process

Text by Liza Zogib, Divya Venkatesh, Sandra Spissinger, and Concha Salguero . Artwork by Almudena Sánchez Sánchez, Ana Trejo Rodríguez, and Inés García Zapata . What follows is the story of One Square Meter — a story of how a creative art piece can make a compelling case for conservation in an entirely different way.