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Learning Our Language Is Like Learning to See in Full Color: An Interview with Gisèle Maria Martin (Tla-o-qui-aht)

Interview by Luisa Maffi, Editor of Langscape Magazine, Co-founder and Director, Terralingua In June of 2019, I was very fortunate to attend a unique event: the HELISET TŦE SḰÁL “Let the Languages Live” conference in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (June 24–26, 2019). Organized by the First Peoples’ Cultural Council and the First Peoples’ Cultural Foundation,

Lessons of the Maasai Warriors (Morani)

Indigenous Languages

Story by Edna Kilusu (Tanzanian Maasai), age 19   “Do not come back after I lock the door,” my mother says, warning me not to be late returning tonight. While she milks the cows, I quickly build the fire and ensure that it is ready for making ugali, an everyday meal of corn flour and water

A New Approach to Bilingual Marine Conservation Science Education | The Collaborative work of Caribbean Communities and Marine Conservation without Borders

by Thomas Dean King . . Marine Conservation without Borders (MCwB) is a nongovernmental organization that translates scientific ideas into oral languages that currently lack words to express such concepts. MCwB’s Executive Director, Robert C. “Robby” Thigpen, has built a network of collaborators among a diversity of linguistic communities and conservation advocates throughout the Caribbean. MCwB

An Ancient Game Opens the Door to Innovation in the Farma Valley, Southern Tuscany, Italy

by Andrea Giacomelli . To reach the Farma Valley in Southern Tuscany, Italy, you need to stray far off the standard tourist routes south of Siena and away from the seaside, too. Set in the heart of the Metalliferous Hills, the valley covers approximately 120 square kilometers and includes three natural conservation areas with a

Visions from Within | Another Shot for Biocultural Conservation in the Cradle of Humankind

Text and Photos by Thor Morales . . Imagine you’re in the cradle of humankind. Cultures similar to yours have thrived in a seemingly barren, rock-strewn desert for thousands of years. But now, once frequently practiced rites, ceremonies, and traditions are losing vigor, and your mother tongue is falling by the wayside as you adopt a

When Art Beats Science | Saving Tree Kangaroos with Song and Dance in Papua New Guinea

by Jean Thomas . . For tens of thousands of years, the people of Papua New Guinea (PNG) have hunted animals for food. They used bows and arrows, made traps, and used poison vines. In the 1950s this all changed for the Wape people of the Torricelli Mountain Range, a remote area in northwestern PNG.

To the Golden Mountains of Altai, Southern Siberia | A Journey of Language and Soul

traditional knowledge

By Joanna Dobson . I traveled to Altai for the second time in 2002. On my first visit there two years back, the landscapes of this small republic in southern Siberia made such a profound impression on me that I felt I had to return. When I recall this second journey, I find that I am

Biocultural Diversity Conservation Tourism | The Gamaran Protected Forest, West Sumatra, Indonesia

by Tom Corcoran . To Walk in the Gamaran Protected Forest Given the myriad of contradictions, spending time in the ancient forests of West Sumatra with Minangkabau people (Minang) is perhaps a challenge for the mind and spirit of any conservationist. Traditionally a people of the forest, the Minang are the world’s largest matrilineal society, with

Mirroring the Land | Biocultural Diversity Embodied

biocultural diversity

Photos and text by Sonja Swift When it rains in California I rejoice. I see the land drinking. I see grass blades emerging, shining jade green where there was only thatch, brittle and crisp, next to a stone-dry cow patty. I know the dusty taste of summer here, and the dread of summer prolonged. I know

“Buen Vivir” | Learnings from Indigenous Worldviews on Biocultural Diversity

biodiversity

by Katherine Zavala At 4,000 meters high, surrounded by mountaintops, looking over a deep blue lake, I am welcomed by a group of Indigenous Quechua members in the Andes Mountains of Peru. They are members of the Association of Communities in the Potato Park (ACPP), Parque de la Papa, which unites more than 6,000 members