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My Extinction Rebellion through Education: A Young Dohoi Woman’s Message

village children

Lina A. Karolin One morning, I woke up early and, carefully parting the mosquito net that hung above me, I walked to the window next to my wooden bunk. I opened the window gently, trying not to make any noise so as not to wake the others up. It was dim outside, but I could

Lessons of the Maasai Warriors (Morani)

Maasai Warriors

Story by Edna Kilusu (Tanzanian Maasai), age 19   “Do not come back after I lock the door,” my mother says, warning me not to be late returning tonight. While she milks the cows, I quickly build the fire and ensure that it is ready for making ugali, an everyday meal of corn flour and water

Learning Our Language Is Like Learning to See in Full Color: An Interview with Gisèle Maria Martin (Tla-o-qui-aht)

Interview by Luisa Maffi, Editor of Langscape Magazine, Co-founder and Director, Terralingua In June of 2019, I was very fortunate to attend a unique event: the HELISET TŦE SḰÁL “Let the Languages Live” conference in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (June 24–26, 2019). Organized by the First Peoples’ Cultural Council and the First Peoples’ Cultural Foundation,

The Biocultural Fabric of Renosterveld: A Unique Ecosystem at the Heart of the Swartland, South Africa

wind-powered water pump

Text and photos by Emmeline Topp “You know how the Swartland got its name? It’s the Black Land,” the farmer tells me. His face is lined beyond his thirty-two years, decades of weather and work deepening its contours and tanning its skin. “When the Europeans first arrived two hundred years ago, all they saw was

An Ancient Game Opens the Door to Innovation in the Farma Valley, Southern Tuscany, Italy

by Andrea Giacomelli . To reach the Farma Valley in Southern Tuscany, Italy, you need to stray far off the standard tourist routes south of Siena and away from the seaside, too. Set in the heart of the Metalliferous Hills, the valley covers approximately 120 square kilometers and includes three natural conservation areas with a

Community and Biocultural Diversity Conservation in Ethiopia: Learning from Each Other

Text and photos by Fassil Gebeyehu Yelemtu I shall tell the story of my community in this article, but let me first say a few words about my interest in biocultural diversity conservation. Being exposed to the modern world and looking at unsuccessful stories of nature conservation, I always ask myself what the missing link

A Few Short Journeys along the Nature-Culture Continuum: Reflections on Community-Led Conservation

by Jessica Brown In late 2016, I made my first visit to the sacred forest that belongs to a village in the Togo mountain range of eastern Ghana, hiking up a small mountain to the forest accompanied by a dozen or so people from the community. The sun was beginning to set over the Volta

Biocultural Diversity as Observed from the Hawaiian Nation

Text and photos by Harvy King As humankind’s connection to land and water evolved, our development of agriculture produced the availability of abundant food systems. Our civilizations grew; our cultures became more diverse. Religious and spiritual relationships between humans and nature maintained overall well-being and progressively improved the quality of life. Then, something changed. Spirituality

A New Approach to Bilingual Marine Conservation Science Education: The Collaborative work of Caribbean Communities and Marine Conservation without Borders

by Thomas Dean King . . Marine Conservation without Borders (MCwB) is a nongovernmental organization that translates scientific ideas into oral languages that currently lack words to express such concepts. MCwB’s Executive Director, Robert C. “Robby” Thigpen, has built a network of collaborators among a diversity of linguistic communities and conservation advocates throughout the Caribbean. MCwB

Visions from Within: Another Shot for Biocultural Conservation in the Cradle of Humankind

Text and photos by Thor Morales . . Imagine you’re in the cradle of humankind. Cultures similar to yours have thrived in a seemingly barren, rock-strewn desert for thousands of years. But now, once frequently practiced rites, ceremonies, and traditions are losing vigor, and your mother tongue is falling by the wayside as you adopt