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Pandemic Perspectives: Elephants at the Door, Masks at the Market

During a pandemic, Indigenous communities tend to be among the most vulnerable, given their often-limited access to water, food supplies, adequate healthcare, and other factors. In this special “Pandemic Perspectives” series of our Dispatches, we’re sharing stories from around the world to shed some light on the obstacles Indigenous Peoples face in light of COVID-19

Pandemic Perspectives: The Peruvian Shipibo-Konibo People’s Response

Chonon Bensho and Pedro Favaron, members of Peru's Shipibo-Konibo people.

During a pandemic, Indigenous communities tend to be among the most vulnerable, given their often-limited access to water, food supplies, adequate healthcare, and other factors. In this special “Pandemic Perspectives” series of our Dispatches, we’re sharing stories from around the world to shed some light on the obstacles Indigenous Peoples face in light of COVID-19

Food and Fun in the Forest: An Indian Village Turns to Nature during a Pandemic-Induced Lockdown

Radhika Borde and Siman Hansdak Once upon a time, growing up as an Adivasi in rural Jharkhand in eastern India meant learning what the forest could provide in terms of nourishment, education, and enjoyment— as for Adivasis, a group claiming an Indigenous identity, the forest was a context for living rather than a resource to

Quarantine as Ceremony: COVID-19 as an Opportunity to Quietly Rebel against the Dominant Langscape

Severn Cullis-Suzuki The Haida people know the cost of disease. They have lived in Haida Gwaii, an archipelago off the west coast of Canada, for the past 14,000 years. In their recent history, after the first encounter with Europeans in 1774, waves of smallpox, measles, and other contact diseases ravaged the Haida population. From 30,000-strong,

Pandemic Perspectives: Thoughts from a Young Writer in Ghana

Two Ghanaian women wearing nose masks and handkerchiefs.

During a pandemic, Indigenous communities tend to be among the most vulnerable, given their often-limited access to water, food supplies, adequate healthcare, and other factors. In this special “Pandemic Perspectives” series of our Dispatches, we’re sharing stories from around the world to shed some light on the obstacles Indigenous Peoples face in light of COVID-19

Muriira: Reviving Culture, Nature, and Ritual in Tharaka, Kenya

Simon Mitambo Right now, in July 2020, it is the harvest season in Tharaka, the bigger of the two harvest seasons we get every year in this part of Kenya. Usually this is a busy time on the farm, a time when people come together and work communally to ensure a good harvest. But the

A Different World is Possible—One Free of Racism & Discrimination

Lake Forest, CA, USA - Black Lives Matter Protest

I’ve heard the current COVID-19 pandemic described as “the great revealer” and “a moral provocation.” Both are true. The pandemic is a great revealer because, around the world, the patterns of COVID-19’s spread, intensity, and corresponding societal response have coincided to a disturbingly telling extent with the geography of inequality, discrimination, and social injustice. More

Pandemic Perspectives: A Protective Rice Ritual in Tumbang Habangoi, Borneo

During a pandemic, Indigenous communities tend to be among the most vulnerable, given their often-limited access to water, food supplies, adequate healthcare, and other factors. In this special “Pandemic Perspectives” series of our Dispatches, we’re sharing stories from around the world to shed some light on the obstacles Indigenous Peoples face in light of COVID-19

Pandemic Perspectives: Photo Essay from Tla-o-qui-aht Territory

Joe Martin explains how to make harpoon tips

  During a pandemic, Indigenous communities tend to be among the most vulnerable, given their often-limited access to water, food supplies, adequate healthcare, and other factors. In this special “Pandemic Perspectives” series of our Dispatches, we’re sharing stories from around the world to shed some light on the obstacles Indigenous Peoples face in light of

Remembering Licho, the Last Speaker of the Sare Language

Folk tale creation myth released by Licho

Last month, there were just four people left on earth who could speak a language from the Great Andamanic family, which hails from the Andaman Islands in the Bay of Bengal. On April 4, one of those speakers—a woman named Licho—passed away from tuberculosis and heart disease. She was the last woman alive to speak