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Weaving Reverence, Respect, and Resilience into the Amazon Forest

Indigenous artisans rekindle reverence for a plant that has been traditionally used for centuries. WORDS Clare Dowd, Isabel Carrió, and Leah Struzenski | IMAGES Tulio Dávila     Armed with long black spines, the chambira plant, a canopy palm that grows throughout the Amazon rainforest, is integral to the economy of the Bora, an Indigenous

Greetings from Maumere, Indonesia

Suhartini, Maria

A young Sikka Indigenous woman models garments made from natural materials, proud to look modern while helping to preserve her heritage. Tytin Mariyati Suhartini Tius     Hello, I am Maria (Tytin) Mariyati Suhartini Tius, a young Indigenous woman from Maumere, a small city in the Sikka Regency of Flores Island, Indonesia. In this region,

One Square Meter: Wool Art Honors the Biocultural Diversity of Mobile Pastoralists

needle-felting process

WORDS Liza Zogib, Divya Venkatesh, Sandra Spissinger, and Concha Salguero ART Almudena Sánchez Sánchez, Ana Trejo Rodríguez, and Inés García Zapata What follows is the story of One Square Meter — a story of how a creative art piece can make a compelling case for conservation in an entirely different way.   DiversEarth is one

Photo Gallery: Tsurushibina

IMAGES Mariia Ermilova . . . . . . . . . Read the full “Tsurushibina” story with more text, photos, and artwork by Mariia Ermilova. Back to Volume 10   |   Read the Table of Contents   |   Like Our Stories? Please Donate! . Mariia Ermilova, PhD, is a postdoctoral researcher at the Graduate School of

Tsurushibina: A Traditional Japanese Craft Helps Maintain and Restore Biocultural Knowledge and People’s Connection with Nature

WORDS AND IMAGES Mariia Ermilova “Nature is painting for us, day after day, pictures of infinite beauty if only we have the eyes to see them.”   — John Ruskin . I want to tell you the story of a Japanese craft that impressed me for its deep connection with the culture and customs of the people. As

Photo Gallery: Tsurushibina

Photos and artwork by Mariia Ermilova . . . . . . . . . This photo gallery is an extension of the full story about tsurushibina. . Back to Vol. 6, Issue 2 | Read the Table of Contents | Like Our Stories? Please Donate!   Mariia Ermilova is pursuing a PhD degree in Landscape Planning at Chiba University’s

Tsurushibina: A Traditional Japanese Craft Helps Maintain and Restore Biocultural Knowledge and People’s Connection with Nature

Text, photos, and artwork by Mariia Ermilova “Nature is painting for us, day after day, pictures of infinite beauty if only we have the eyes to see them.”   — John Ruskin . I want to tell you the story of a Japanese craft that impressed me for its deep connection with the culture and customs of the people.