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Iawa: The Unfinished Kuruaya Symphony

Iawa

Miguel Pinheiro In the heart of the Amazon Rainforest, along the Xingu River and one of its tributaries, the Iriri, traces of an ancient, vanished population are found. The petroglyphs carved in the rocks tell a ghost story—faint echoes of faded voices that today we struggle to imagine alive. A language can be a map

My Oxygen

Fauzi Bin Abdul Majid My oxygen is love My oxygen is joy My oxygen is forgiveness My oxygen is nature My oxygen is togetherness Their oxygen is money Their oxygen is power Their oxygen is war Their oxygen is killing Their oxygen is hate They took my oxygen away, So they can breathe. They killed

Guardians of the Forest: Can Securing Indigenous Land Rights Help Combat Climate Change and Prevent the Next Pandemic?

Daniel Henryk Rasolt with artwork by Vannessa Circe   Traditional Indigenous territories are complex, adaptable, and resilient socio-ecological systems that contain the majority of the world’s biocultural diversity. But can Indigenous Peoples play a leading role in both combating climate change and preventing the next pandemic? Right now, there is a fair amount of rhetoric

No More Invisible People on Secret Committees: An Aboriginal Man’s Fight for Cultural Safety

Mark Lock interviewed by Stephen Houston Stephen Houston: Can you please introduce yourself? Mark Lock: I am Mark Lock from the Ngiyampaa people, an Australian Aboriginal tribe from rural Australia. You can see that I have “fair” skin and blue eyes because of my mixed heritage (Latvian, Scottish, English, and Scandinavian, in addition to Ngyampaa).

Please Talk to Me! I Am a Stranger Until You Talk to Me

Edna Kilusu (Tanzanian Maasai) “What?” my friend and I said simultaneously. The sheriff had asked if we had any drugs or guns with us. It was a calm, hot summer evening when we decided to go on a short bike ride after a long, boring three months of quarantine in Ogallala, Nebraska. We biked down

To the Roots: A Maya Reunion

A film by Steve Bartz . To the Roots: A Maya Reunion. Video: Steve Bartz, 1998. Watch film credits. We present this film by the late filmmaker Steve Bartz as a complement to Jim Nation’s story. Shot in 1998, the film chronicles a historic encounter between the Lacandón Maya and a group of Itza Maya

Quarantine as Ceremony: COVID-19 as an Opportunity to Quietly Rebel against the Dominant Langscape

Severn Cullis-Suzuki The Haida people know the cost of disease. They have lived in Haida Gwaii, an archipelago off the west coast of Canada, for the past 14,000 years. In their recent history, after the first encounter with Europeans in 1774, waves of smallpox, measles, and other contact diseases ravaged the Haida population. From 30,000-strong,

Muriira: Reviving Culture, Nature, and Ritual in Tharaka, Kenya

Simon Mitambo Right now, in July 2020, it is the harvest season in Tharaka, the bigger of the two harvest seasons we get every year in this part of Kenya. Usually this is a busy time on the farm, a time when people come together and work communally to ensure a good harvest. But the

The Dam Departed

Dam Departed

Teja Jonnalagadda We have fallen so far from where the water fell. There a wall stands now to power dishwashers, curling irons, flat screen TVs, and telephone poles. The fish no longer swim freely. Crawling up step ladders like meticulous marmosets. Flooded the valley floor, to ensure that we can always take more. We have

A Different World is Possible—One Free of Racism & Discrimination

Lake Forest, CA, USA - Black Lives Matter Protest

I’ve heard the current COVID-19 pandemic described as “the great revealer” and “a moral provocation.” Both are true. The pandemic is a great revealer because, around the world, the patterns of COVID-19’s spread, intensity, and corresponding societal response have coincided to a disturbingly telling extent with the geography of inequality, discrimination, and social injustice. More