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La Marabunta in Brazil: Indigenous Women as Biocultural Diversity Defenders

Thor Morales In Mexico, biocultural diversity is perpetuated and nurtured mainly by women. Indigenous women take care of the culture and the land: they teach the mother tongues; cook traditional foods; cure with local herbs and ancestral knowledge; retain the traditional attire; and more strictly follow the usos y costumbres (customs and habits), the traditional

Ainbon Jakon Joi: The Good Word of an Indigenous Woman

Chonon Bensho with Pedro Favaron When I was born, my parents registered my birth in the town of Yarinacocha, giving me the name Astrith Gonzales Agustín. But in Shipibo-Konibo, my mother tongue, my name is Chonon Bensho, which means “the swallow from medicine orchards.” I am heir to the knowledge of my ancestors. My husband’s

Land needs Language needs Land

Chloe Dragon Smith On the Land We feel The roots beneath our languages— Twisting and turning, gnarly, knowing. On the Land We learn With bodymindheartandsoul, The truths that shaped our words Long before they were spoken. Language is more than words and Words hold more than any language Could ever explain. Simple rhythmic sound waves

As Violent as Words: An Innu Woman’s Thoughts about Decolonizing Language

Marie-Émilie Lacroix interviewed by Marco Romagnoli “Dialogue is a way of knowing myself and of disentangling my own point of view from other viewpoints and from me, because it is grounded so deeply in my own roots as to be utterly hidden from me.” —Raimon Panikkar This is, at its simplest, the reason behind my

Editorial | Changing Our Lives, Sowing New Seeds

Langscape Magazine 9

The Other Extinction Rebellion: Countering the Loss of Biocultural Diversity Langscape Magazine Volume 9, Double Issue Summer/ Winter 2020 . With the climate emergency threatening life as we know it, an Extinction Rebellion movement has been afoot. We at Terralingua, however, believe there is another crisis against which the world should rebel too: the “biocultural

Ancestral Sayings and Indigenous Knowledge: Learning from Māori Oral Tradition

by Hēmi Whaanga and Priscilla Wehi . . E koekoe te tūī, e ketekete te kākā, e kūkū te kererū “The tūī chatters, the parrot gabbles, the wood pigeon coos.” (A saying for “It takes all kinds…”) Hēmi: As a young child, I often sat at the window of my house peering out at the

Ewaso Ng’iro Camel Caravan

biocultural diversity

Video and text by Laissa Malih (Kenyan Laikipian Maasai), age 25 The Ewaso Ng’iro Camel Caravan is a five-day annual journey for climate change adaptation and peaceful co-existence along the Ewaso Ng’iro River in Kenya. The purpose is to promote shared understanding of threats facing the river, along with the cooperation needed to lessen them. Camels are used

Can the Cenotes be Saved?

Text and photos by Yolanda López-Maldonado (Yucatec Maya, Mexico) . “This is the account of how all was in suspense, all calm, in silence; all motionless, still, and the expanse of the sky was empty. . . . There was nothing standing, only the calm water, the placid sea, alone and tranquil. Nothing existed.”   — Popol

Biocultural Heritage: The Fishing Villages of the Far North of Sweden

by Joakim Boström and Anna-Märta Henriksson (Kalix, Sweden) and Marie Kvarnström In the villages of the Kalix archipelago in the far north of Sweden, the community-based organization Kustringen is aiming to conserve local and traditional knowledge, practices, and innovations related to fishing and archipelago life in general. The archipelago lies in the Bothnian Bay, the

North East Network Farm School

biodiversity

Story by Kewekhrozo (Peter) Thopi, age 30, Chakhesang Naga (India); and Tshenyilou (Lele) Chirhah, age 26, Chakhesang Naga (India) Nagaland is a small mountain state in the North East Region (NER) of India. NER is one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots, and the diverse ethnic communities of the region have significantly contributed to sustaining this