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Making Haku Chhoyala | Food Brings a Nepalese Indigenous Community Together

Sheetal Vaidya, Manju Maharjan, and Prakash Khadgi . Evolutionary studies of the human brain conclude that intelligence is directly linked to meat consumption  —  not because of its nutritional qualities but because of the cognitive abilities that are needed for the strategic sharing of meat within groups. The intellectual capacity needed for such sharing is believed

CreativeVoice | Cooking Stories with Native Maize

biocultural diversity

by Flor Rivera López . This is the story of a project aiming to promote native maize biodiversity conservation in Mexico. It started when I was having a conversation with native maize farmers there about transgenic corn and its potential effects. An elderly farmer told me, “You are concerned about what kind of seed we will

Reviving Foods, Preserving Culture: My Journey as an Indigenous Food Entrepreneur

Indigenous knowledge

by Aruna Tirkey . I want to share with you the story of a journey I have begun. I am not on my way to a physical destination; rather, I am moving toward a goal: to revive local and Indigenous food as a means to strengthen my own Indigenous culture. To get there, I’m not counting on

Editorial | Repast

cultural diversity

Nourishing Body and Soul: The Biocultural Diversity of Food Langscape Magazine Volume 7, Issue 2, Winter 2018 . Repast by David Harmon . Being together, sharing food. More than any other, this needful act sets the rhythm of human life. For those of us fortunate enough to live that life free of hunger, of the

Innovations as Part of Sustainable Practices in Biocultural Landscapes: Experiences from Rotational Farming in the Hin Lad Nai Community of Northern Thailand

by Pernilla Malmer and Prasert Trakansuphakon . . Rotational farming is traditionally practiced in a variety of biocultural landscapes across the world and contributes to sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation. Despite this, it is sometimes viewed as unsophisticated and even illegal, in particular, by powerful actors who prefer forests be used for exploitation or as

Can the Cenotes be Saved? Biocultural Conservation in Yucatán, Mexico

Text and photos by Yolanda López-Maldonado . “This is the account of how all was in suspense, all calm, in silence; all motionless, still, and the expanse of the sky was empty. . . . There was nothing standing, only the calm water, the placid sea, alone and tranquil. Nothing existed.” — Popol Vuh . . It’s rainy season in

Heal the Land, Heal the People: Strengthening Relationships at Hwaaqw’um in the Salish Sea

Text by Joe Akerman (T’awaxwultun) | Photos by Xwaaqw’um Project .   Maakw’stem ‘uw huliitun tst. Maaqkw’stem ‘uw slhilhukw’tul “Everything is what sustains us. Everything is interconnected.” This is a story about coming home to a Quw’utsun (Hul’q’umi’num, Coast Salish) village site to heal. To heal the land, relationships with one another, and the people

Hta: How Karen Farming Saved a Forest in Thailand and Its Poetry Changed International Policy

Text by Viveca Mellegård | Photos by Pernilla Malmer With words & lived experience of members of the Karen Community of Hin Lad Nai and input from Pernilla Malmer . . “Live with the water, care for the river, live with trees, care for the forest. Live with the fish, care for the spawning grounds, live

Monocultures of the Fields, Monocultures of the Mind | The Acculturation of Indigenous Farming of…

by Kanna K. Siripurapu, Sabnam Afrein, and Prasant Mohanty . . The connection between agriculture and major festivals of India, traditionally and predominantly an agrarian society, is unmistakable. The Indigenous agro-biodiversity and cultural diversity of the Indian subcontinent likely co-evolved over thousands of years in synchrony and harmony with each other. The winds are fast changing,

Listening to Our Ancestors | Biocultural Diversity through the Indigenous Lens

Text by Jon Waterhouse | Photos by Mary Marshall . . We are now living in the digital era, when practically every component of our lives appears to be moving at an ever-increasing, unstoppable pace. In many instances it is clear that we humans are not capable of keeping up with the technology we are creating,