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Yarning on Country: Reinvigorating Biocultural Diversity in Australia

Wild Orange flower on its branch

Three people from different backgrounds weave together their personal and collective histories, deeply intertwined with Country. Sophie Zaccone, David Doyle, and Mark Lock In sunburnt Australia struggling with climate change, land degradation, and biodiversity loss, three people connect to reinvigorate Country — a First Nations Australian way of being. Dave and Mark are First Nations

Recognition: How to Keep Biocultural Diversity Alive

A Baiga man from Achanakmar Tiger Reserve

A Santhal woman embarks on a quest to understand her identity and what makes biocultural diversity thrive. Purabi Bose Reverence, respect, reciprocity: are there any alternatives to these fundamental principles for the survival of biocultural diversity? The answer is negative. One of the take-home messages of COVID-19 is that, for nature, the world is without

Making Kin: The Interconnected Lives of the Mising People of India

A Mising woman preparing apong.

An Indigenous community’s respect toward all life offers a hopeful vision to the world. WORDS AND IMAGES    Suprita Chatterjee . India has a large population of Indigenous Peoples, with an estimated population of 104 million (2011 census), a large majority of them living in the northeast region of the country. Often seen as a

Relatives of the Deep

Conversation with J,SIṈTEN John Elliott A respected Elder shares important teachings that are intrinsic to his people’s language and way of life. Luisa Maffi     “Our languages are a part of the winds, the rain, the mountains, and all life as it was given. These are our original laws and our sacred connections to

Living-Language-Land: Listening to Nature in Languages Not Our Own

Ghislain Bédard art

A journey through endangered and minority languages that reveals diverse ways of relating to land and nature. Philippa Bayley and Neville Gabie, with Missinak Kameltoutasset (Marie-Émilie Lacroix) and contributors to Living-Language-Land     The languages we speak shape much of how we understand the world around us, including our connections to land and nature. But

Indigenous Resilience and Regeneration: Cultural and Linguistic Revitalization during the Global Pandemic

Tharakan women

Amid the challenges of the pandemic, communities in India, Kenya, and Canada find a silver lining. David Stringer   Over more than two years of the global COVID-19 pandemic, much of the focus in the media has been on the negative impacts worldwide, particularly on vulnerable minorities and Indigenous Peoples. Yet, paradoxically, as Indigenous communities

Deep Questions to Ask Planet Ocean

eelgrass

The search for a sea grain known for centuries to an Indigenous people provokes deep questions and insights. WORDS Gary Paul Nabhan | IMAGES Juan Martín   We come back to the sea, humbly, not with answers but with deep questions. Our eight-meter-long boat sets out into the emerald waters of the Sea of Cortés

Greetings from the High Atlas Mountains, Morocco

High Atlast Mountains, Morocco

A photographer and filmmaker shares a portrait of an Amazigh woman and her story of courage and resilience. WORDS AND IMAGE    İnanç Tekgüç   Hello, I am a photographer, filmmaker, and visual anthropologist from the island of Cyprus. As a part of my craft, I enjoy portraying people of diverse backgrounds. In my most

The Wild Symphony: Making Music with the Ancient Voices of the Amazon

The Wild Symphony

In the Colombian Amazon, musicians listen to the forest and create music that resonates with it. WORDS, IMAGES, AND VIDEO    Diego Samper     Calanoa is a place of encounters. Encounters with the other and with the Wild. It is a laboratory of applied creativity, a lab of alternative educational processes, a lab where art is understood as

Apricot Tree

A poem that pays homage to trees as our Elders, life-givers, and first teachers. Chang Liu (劉長亭)   Disciple-less, you were dropping bushels of unrecorded wisdom all over the sidewalk in great pulpy explosions.   The owners were away for the summer — not to blame.   Years later, to my microphone a shriveled Ngäbere