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Traditional Treasure: Local Knowledge for Climate Change Adaptation in Bangkukuk Taik, Nicaragua

biocultural diversity

by Marie Besses and Martina Luger It’s 7 a.m., still early enough to leave Bluefields with a panga (skiff boat). The captain is watching the sky with a little concern. A gentle breeze is blowing, and it’s important to leave early before the wind stirs up the sea causing large waves. It takes two hours

Culturally-Mediated Disturbance: Building a Bridge Between Knowledge Systems to Conserve Biocultural Diversity in New Guinea

Hewa traditions

by William H. Thomas Buried deep within the Western psyche rests a romantic myth that neither evidence nor exposure has been able to extinguish—the Noble Savage. Although it no longer has scientific currency, the idea that traditional societies uncorrupted by civilization are able to live in balance with their surroundings continues to subtly permeate the

In the Land of the River-Mirrors: Dialogues about “Bee-cultural” Diversity

biocultural diversity

by Juan Manuel Rosso Londoño and Walter Gabriel Estrada Ramírez Origins Juan I was born in 1975 in Bogotá, Colombia, surrounded by the high summits of the northwestern Andes. The growing city was my main playground, but I retain my countryside experiences among my best early memories. My father’s hands and voice guided me in

Free-Flow: Why Cultural Diversity Matters for Healthy Rivers

biocultural diversity

by David Groenfeldt It has been proposed that we are living in a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, in recognition that today the number one actor on the physical condition of the planet is not volcanoes or oceans or earthquakes, but us—people. We are only beginning to come to terms with our power, but one