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Editorial | Naturelings: Rejoining the Circle of Life

Langscape 11

Reverence, Respect, and Reciprocity: Cornerstones of Biocultural Diversity Langscape Magazine, Volume 11,  Double Issue Summer/Winter 2022   A just, equitable, sustainable world in which the biocultural diversity of life can thrive: that has been Terralingua’s vision for over twenty-five years now. It’s a vision that, I know, resonates with many. Yet, it’s also a vision

Being in, and with, Biocultural Landscapes: Alternative Visions

Kakadu National Park, Burrungkuy (Nourlangie Rock).

Walking through ancient cultural and spiritual landscapes inspires reverence, respect, and a sense of ethics of place. WORDS AND IMAGES    Michael Davis  . Can we perceive landscape as more than “mere” topography, land, or landform? By engaging with landscapes in multidimensional ways, we can reshape our relationships with them, embracing them ethically and respectfully

Yarning on Country: Reinvigorating Biocultural Diversity in Australia

Wild Orange flower on its branch

Three people from different backgrounds weave together their personal and collective histories, deeply intertwined with Country. Sophie Zaccone, David Doyle, and Mark Lock In sunburnt Australia struggling with climate change, land degradation, and biodiversity loss, three people connect to reinvigorate Country — a First Nations Australian way of being. Dave and Mark are First Nations

To My Grandmother, with Love

A woman finds hope and connection on the farm that gave her grandma life and love. Dea Sofie Kudsk     My grandmother is the heroine in this story. It’s all about her hands, her head with the blue and white scarf, her red braids hanging down her back while she is out there in

Recognition: How to Keep Biocultural Diversity Alive

A Baiga man from Achanakmar Tiger Reserve

A Santhal woman embarks on a quest to understand her identity and what makes biocultural diversity thrive. Purabi Bose Reverence, respect, reciprocity: are there any alternatives to these fundamental principles for the survival of biocultural diversity? The answer is negative. One of the take-home messages of COVID-19 is that, for nature, the world is without

Making Kin: The Interconnected Lives of the Mising People of India

A Mising woman preparing apong.

An Indigenous community’s respect toward all life offers a hopeful vision to the world. WORDS AND IMAGES    Suprita Chatterjee . India has a large population of Indigenous Peoples, with an estimated population of 104 million (2011 census), a large majority of them living in the northeast region of the country. Often seen as a

Yu-ba-na-u-re: Sowing Seeds to Heal the World

Reviving traditional crops and food culture is vital to repairing people’s relationship with the land. Kana Koa Weaver Okada   Nna-ma-matsu Tani-nu-du-yo The seed that we sow now Ju-gatsu-matsu Awa-nu-do-yo The awa seed we sow in the tenth month (chant) Yo-ya-te-ba Yu-ya-na-u-re If they grow well, we will have a good harvest Sa sa Hou-nen

Protected by Prayer: Reverence, Respect, and Reciprocity at the Heart of Sacred Natural Sites in the Mediterranean

Greek Orthodox Monastère de Solan in France

Spiritual values are the key to a harmonious relationship with the earth. Liza Zogib and Sandra Spissinger-Bang     Protecting lands, territories, and the gifts of nature has been a human endeavor for millennia. That endeavor still exists, best exemplified by Indigenous Peoples around the globe and by other communities and individuals who maintain an

Language, Culture, and Land: Lenses of Lilies

Pilawuk White

At a pond’s edge, a woman muses about waterlilies as metaphors for mother-tongue languages and their power to anchor story, wisdom, and heritage. Dawn Wink . Waterlilies hold a special place in my heart. I did not grow up with them, though. I grew up on a remote ranch amid the sand, rocks, cacti, and

Weaving Reverence, Respect, and Resilience into the Amazon Forest

Indigenous artisans rekindle reverence for a plant that has been traditionally used for centuries. WORDS Clare Dowd, Isabel Carrió, and Leah Struzenski | IMAGES Tulio Dávila     Armed with long black spines, the chambira plant, a canopy palm that grows throughout the Amazon rainforest, is integral to the economy of the Bora, an Indigenous