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Iawa: The Unfinished Kuruaya Symphony

Iawa

Miguel Pinheiro In the heart of the Amazon Rainforest, along the Xingu River and one of its tributaries, the Iriri, traces of an ancient, vanished population are found. The petroglyphs carved in the rocks tell a ghost story—faint echoes of faded voices that today we struggle to imagine alive. A language can be a map

Guardians of the Forest: Can Securing Indigenous Land Rights Help Combat Climate Change and Prevent the Next Pandemic?

Daniel Henryk Rasolt with artwork by Vannessa Circe   Traditional Indigenous territories are complex, adaptable, and resilient socio-ecological systems that contain the majority of the world’s biocultural diversity. But can Indigenous Peoples play a leading role in both combating climate change and preventing the next pandemic? Right now, there is a fair amount of rhetoric

To the Roots: A Maya Reunion

A film by Steve Bartz . To the Roots: A Maya Reunion. Video: Steve Bartz, 1998. Watch film credits. We present this film by the late filmmaker Steve Bartz as a complement to Jim Nation’s story. Shot in 1998, the film chronicles a historic encounter between the Lacandón Maya and a group of Itza Maya

The Through Line: Lacandón Maya, Their Forest, and the Future

James D. Nations Through line = The connecting theme, the spine, the thread that connects people to their objective and pushes them forward. “Take care of the forest, like before, like the ancestors did. Take good care of the forest.” Years ago, when linguist Suzanne Cook asked Chan K’in, a Lacandón Maya Elder, what message

Pandemic Perspectives: The Peruvian Shipibo-Konibo People’s Response

Chonon Bensho and Pedro Favaron, members of Peru's Shipibo-Konibo people.

During a pandemic, Indigenous communities tend to be among the most vulnerable, given their often-limited access to water, food supplies, adequate healthcare, and other factors. In this special “Pandemic Perspectives” series of our Dispatches, we’re sharing stories from around the world to shed some light on the obstacles Indigenous Peoples face in light of COVID-19

La Marabunta in Brazil: Indigenous Women as Biocultural Diversity Defenders

Thor Morales In Mexico, biocultural diversity is perpetuated and nurtured mainly by women. Indigenous women take care of the culture and the land: they teach the mother tongues; cook traditional foods; cure with local herbs and ancestral knowledge; retain the traditional attire; and more strictly follow the usos y costumbres (customs and habits), the traditional

Building Leadership through Reconnection: The Latin American Academy for Food Systems Resilience

Yolanda López Maldonado The Indigenous Peoples of Peru have developed unique traditional knowledge around their food systems. This long tradition is related to the concept of Sumaq Causay, a central philosophy in the Andean Indigenous cosmovision: a holistic vision that takes into account diverse elements of the human condition, recognizing that a range of factors

Ainbon Jakon Joi: The Good Word of an Indigenous Woman

Chonon Bensho with Pedro Favaron When I was born, my parents registered my birth in the town of Yarinacocha, giving me the name Astrith Gonzales Agustín. But in Shipibo-Konibo, my mother tongue, my name is Chonon Bensho, which means “the swallow from medicine orchards.” I am heir to the knowledge of my ancestors. My husband’s

Overcoming the Odds to Reach My Dreams: An Indigenous Artist’s Story

Indigenous Peoples

Story by We’e’ena Tikuna, Tikuna, Brazil, age 30 . I am We’e’ena Tikuna, a member of the Tikuna people of Brazil. My name means “the jaguar that swims to the other side in the river.” My story is the story of an Indigenous woman who has overcome many obstacles. I was born in the Tikuna Umariaçu

Army Ants

participatory video

Story by Eusebia (Chevy) Flores, age 36, Yaqui (Mexico)   I am a founding member of the Indigenous Yaqui and Comcaac film collective, La Marabunta Filmadora, practicing participatory video (PV) across Mexico and beyond. Since learning PV from InsightShare in 2010, we have been using it to preserve our culture and territories. Our name, translated