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Our Children Are Our Hope and Future: Reflections of a W̱SÁNEĆ Language Apprentice Turned Language Immersion Teacher

Indigenous languages

Story by SX̱EDŦELISIYE (Renee Sampson, W̱SÁNEĆ, age 37), with an introduction by Luisa Maffi, Editor of Langscape Magazine, Co-founder and Director, Terralingua . Luisa Maffi, 2019 It was one of those stubbornly-not-yet-summer early June days on Salt Spring Island, British Columbia, on the west coast of Canada, eight years ago. The sky was overcast and

On Being a Chain Link Toward a Stronger Future: An Interview with Skil Jaadee White (Haida, age 24)

Haida

Interview by Luisa Maffi, Editor of Langscape Magazine, Co-founder and Director, Terralingua In June of 2019, I was very fortunate to attend a unique event: the HELISET TŦE SḰÁL “Let the Languages Live” conference in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (June 24–26, 2019). Organized by the First Peoples’ Cultural Council and the First Peoples’ Cultural Foundation,

Circles of Kinship: Faces of Turtle Island’s Seed Guardians

Margaret Brascoupe and Clayton Brascoupe

Text and photos by Mateo Hinojosa “What is a seed?” Farmers, activists, academics, artists, and people of all walks of life take a moment to think of the seeds in their lives—as they digest the grains they ate that morning, finger their necklaces crafted of kernels, send a prayer to their crops in their fields

Grandmother Oak and Her Acorn Teachings

by Sara Moncada and Maya Harjo We come here to listen. Under the beautiful Grandmother Oak grove that sits here along the tributaries of the Ignacio Creek watershed, we have come to listen to stories, to gather as community, to learn from one another and share good food. She is massive and very old, our

Podcasting from the Native Seed Pod: Food Sovereignty Stories Nourish the Future

biocultural diversity

by Melissa K. Nelson “We’re being guided by forces seen and unseen that are telling us it’s time to pick up the seeds again. It’s time to learn how to grow these foods again.” —Rowen White, Episode One, “Native Seed Revolution” Seeds and Stories. Seed stories and stories as seeds. How and why are they

Tunun Kayutukun: Words Have Power

Unangan storytellers - eagle

by Ilarion (Larry) Merculieff and Libby Roderick Contrary to most people in modern societies who see words simply as vehicles for conveying information or expressing thoughts and feelings, people in traditional Indigenous societies view words as entities that carry great power; therefore, they must be chosen and used with utmost care. Most non-Indigenous people don’t

Shle’muxun: Reconnecting with the Salish Sea Bioregion

Salish Sea

by Daniel Kirkpatrick Florence James smiled and said the word again, a little more slowly: “Shle’muxun.” The fifty or so people in the audience quietly rolled the sound across their tongues, trying it out. A helper took a marker and wrote out the word on butcher paper, checked the spelling with Florence, and posted the

Never for Sale: Listening (or Not) to the Language of the Land

Sarah Lambert

by Page Lambert John and I are driving down an unfurling ribbon of highway en route to the Black Hills of Wyoming and the small town of Sundance, population 1222. I’m doing battle with the State’s Department of Transportation, which has decreed to realign a major state highway through the pristine heart of the ranchland

Giving Nature a Critical Voice: A New Approach to Nature Conservation?

Golden, Colorado

Katherine Dominique Lind . In 2014, Nature found her voice. Struggling against deforestation, gasping for air, and fed up with the carelessness of her tenants, Nature spoke up. No more passive-aggressive notes on the fridge; no more pleas imploring care and consideration. Nature put her foot down and reminded humans that she doesn’t need us,

“No one said a word”: Children Give Voice to the Fullness of Language, Landscape, and Life

Cape Breton

by Patrick Howard . We don’t like to think of our lives as predictable, as being mapped out, but our connections to people and place and how they shape who we become are most often undeniable. Much to the surprise of friends and family, on graduating from teacher’s college, I chose to take a position