Tag

Freeway Coyote

Salal in Drought

by Lee Beavington I watch coyote cross the freeway trickster weaves amid wheeled gods her belly droops with gaunt lactation survivor of west coast wild abides two-legged rules of concrete     haste ceaseless in her search The bald eagle roosts in the Hydro tower her nest threaded by power line feathers that once soared rot

Mother Tongues: Two Writers Explore the Words and Cultures That Shape Their Connection to Place

Two-Tailed Swallowtail Butterfly

by Dawn Wink and Susan J. Tweit Of all the arts and sciences made by man, none equals a language, for only a language in its living entirety can describe a unique and irreplaceable world. I saw this once, in the forest in southern Mexico, when a butterfly settled beside me. The color of it

Irony as Inspiration: From Academic Research to Community Action in Protecting Biocultural Landscapes

biocultural diversity

by Kelly Bannister and George Nicholas It is Fall 2014. At the Musqueam Cultural Centre near Vancouver in coastal British Columbia (BC), a meeting is taking place of an international team of cultural heritage scholars, professionals, and Indigenous community experts. The group is holding its final gathering to conclude a seven-year, multimillion-dollar university-based research initiative

Wild Waters: Landscapes of Language

languages

by Dawn Wink . . . in the bottom of a dark canyon, I stood in a shroud of voices. They spun up the canyon walls, radiating through the dusky interior. . . The voices were part of a complex language, a language that formed audible words as water tumbled over rocks, and one that

Free-Flow: Why Cultural Diversity Matters for Healthy Rivers

biocultural diversity

by David Groenfeldt It has been proposed that we are living in a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, in recognition that today the number one actor on the physical condition of the planet is not volcanoes or oceans or earthquakes, but us—people. We are only beginning to come to terms with our power, but one

Combining Environmental Stewardship and Economic Renewal in Northern Canada: The Whitefeather Forest Initiative

Project Contributors: Alex Peters, Andrew Chapeskie, Whitefeather Forest The Whitefeather Forest planning area, located in the boreal region of Ontario and Manitoba, Canada, is a holistic network of both natural and cultural features that results from the relationship between Pikangikum (Ojibwa) people and their ancestral lands. This relationship expresses a closeness that comes not only

Traditional Knowledge for Sustainability: Land use Planning among the Gitxaala of British Columbia, Canada

biocultural diversity

Project Contributor: Charles Menzies For many generations, the Gitxaala people have lived in their territories along the north coast of what is now British Columbia, Canada. Gitxaala laws (Ayawwk) and history (Adaawk) describe in precise detail the relationships of trust, honour and respect that are appropriate for the well-being and continuance of the people, and

Recovering the Connection between People and the Environment through Ancestral Law in British Columbia, Canada

Project Contributor: Patricia Vickers The Nisga’a People of the Nass River have lived on the northwest coast of British Columbia, Canada for generations — long enough for a culture to thrive, adapt, and endure. For the Nisga’a Nation, the meaning of the relationship between people and the environment is found in metaphor and stories. This

Supporting Traditional Health Practices in Urban Areas: Indigenous Theory for First Nations Health in Canada

The dissertation project “Indigenous Theory for Health: Enhancing Traditional-Based Indigenous Health Services in Vancouver,” completed in 2005, was supported by the University of British Columbia and by grants from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR)-funded BC Aboriginal Capacity and Developmental Research Environment (BC ACADRE). It was developed from the informal recommendations of traditional Indigenous

Learning That Wisdom Sits In Places: Apache Students Reconnecting To Land and Identity In Arizona, US

Project Contributors: Jonathan Long and Judy DeHose Over three decades ago years ago, nearly 300 places of cultural importance to the Apache people in the valleys surrounding Cibecue, Arizona were mapped and photographed by anthropologist Keith Basso with the help of Apache tribal elders. The results were published by Basso in 1996, in a book