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The Oyster Picnic

A designer takes responsibility to learn about the landscape and the Aboriginal languages that describe it. WORDS AND ART Kathryn Morgan . In this body of work, I explore the role language can play in honoring lives of the past and the present-day sovereignty of First Nations people. I’m trying to learn about the precolonial

Being in, and with, Biocultural Landscapes: Alternative Visions

Kakadu National Park, Burrungkuy (Nourlangie Rock).

Walking through ancient cultural and spiritual landscapes inspires reverence, respect, and a sense of ethics of place. WORDS AND IMAGES    Michael Davis  . Can we perceive landscape as more than “mere” topography, land, or landform? By engaging with landscapes in multidimensional ways, we can reshape our relationships with them, embracing them ethically and respectfully

Yarning on Country: Reinvigorating Biocultural Diversity in Australia

Wild Orange flower on its branch

Three people from different backgrounds weave together their personal and collective histories, deeply intertwined with Country. Sophie Zaccone, David Doyle, and Mark Lock In sunburnt Australia struggling with climate change, land degradation, and biodiversity loss, three people connect to reinvigorate Country — a First Nations Australian way of being. Dave and Mark are First Nations

Yamani: Voices of an Ancient Land

linguistic diversity

Faith Baisden, Thomas Dick, Carolyn Barker, and Kristina Kelman . . For tens of thousands of years, the rich and beautiful sounds of hundreds of different languages washed across Australia. Over all of the continent it is believed there were more than five hundred languages at one time. Around two hundred years ago, a new

Yamani Project Artists

Yamani: Voices of an Ancient Land

This page complements the photo essay “Yamani: Voices of an Ancient Land,” which presents a unique musical project by the same name, developed by six extraordinary Australian Indigenous women. They came together to support the revitalization of Aboriginal languages and the strengthening of Indigenous identity by creating, singing, and recording songs in their six different

The Frontline of Ideology on Mauna Kea: Kapu Aloha’s Example for the World

biocultural diversity

Harvy King At 4,207 meters above sea level, where the hot sun burns and harsh winds blister and have a tendency to scrape the soul, stands the summit of Mauna Kea, a mountain on Hawai‘i Island (a.k.a. the “Big Island”) that is sacred to Native Hawaiians. That summit has become a “frontline of ideology”—the site

No More Invisible People on Secret Committees: An Aboriginal Man’s Fight for Cultural Safety

Mark Lock interviewed by Stephen Houston Stephen Houston: Can you please introduce yourself? Mark Lock: I am Mark Lock from the Ngiyampaa people, an Australian Aboriginal tribe from rural Australia. You can see that I have “fair” skin and blue eyes because of my mixed heritage (Latvian, Scottish, English, and Scandinavian, in addition to Ngyampaa).

Ancestral Sayings and Indigenous Knowledge: Learning from Māori Oral Tradition

by Hēmi Whaanga and Priscilla Wehi . . E koekoe te tūī, e ketekete te kākā, e kūkū te kererū “The tūī chatters, the parrot gabbles, the wood pigeon coos.” (A saying for “It takes all kinds…”) Hēmi: As a young child, I often sat at the window of my house peering out at the

into this processed woven land

biocultural diversity

by Momoe Malietoa von Reiche In the cool Of morning Moving waters fall Silently seeking Pathways to the sea Blue veined Crisscross a fractured landscape Nervous leftovers of Cultural powerlines that Carved vertical earths Into umbered lakes Reflecting Deceptive silver linings In the sun Shades of a troubled Paradise Lost in camouflaged lushness Azure oceans

Biocultural Diversity as Observed from the Hawaiian Nation

Text and photos by Harvy King As humankind’s connection to land and water evolved, our development of agriculture produced the availability of abundant food systems. Our civilizations grew; our cultures became more diverse. Religious and spiritual relationships between humans and nature maintained overall well-being and progressively improved the quality of life. Then, something changed. Spirituality

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