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Happening to Us: Amplifying Youth Voices from the Arctic

Text by Maéva Gauthier Video by Jasmine Gruben, Brian Kikoak, Carmen Kuptana, Nathan Kuptana, Eriel Lugt, Gabrielle Nogasak, Darryl Tedjuk Nathan Kuptana, nineteen, pauses on the stage in front of hundreds of people, as he feels his ancestors and all the changes they have seen course through his veins. He has been given the stage

La Marabunta in Brazil: Indigenous Women as Biocultural Diversity Defenders

Thor Morales In Mexico, biocultural diversity is perpetuated and nurtured mainly by women. Indigenous women take care of the culture and the land: they teach the mother tongues; cook traditional foods; cure with local herbs and ancestral knowledge; retain the traditional attire; and more strictly follow the usos y costumbres (customs and habits), the traditional

North East Network Farm School

biodiversity

Story by Kewekhrozo (Peter) Thopi, age 30, Chakhesang Naga (India); and Tshenyilou (Lele) Chirhah, age 26, Chakhesang Naga (India) Nagaland is a small mountain state in the North East Region (NER) of India. NER is one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots, and the diverse ethnic communities of the region have significantly contributed to sustaining this

Army Ants

participatory video

Story by Eusebia (Chevy) Flores, age 36, Yaqui (Mexico)   I am a founding member of the Indigenous Yaqui and Comcaac film collective, La Marabunta Filmadora, practicing participatory video (PV) across Mexico and beyond. Since learning PV from InsightShare in 2010, we have been using it to preserve our culture and territories. Our name, translated

Speaking Our Identity

El Molo

Story by Hellen Losapicho, age 34, El Molo (Kenya), and Magella Hassan Lenatiyama, age 35, El Molo (Kenya) The last fluent speaker of our language, El Molo, died in 1999, and it is now one of the most endangered languages in the world. When the Samburu people moved into our territories after an outbreak of

Visions from Within: Another Shot for Biocultural Conservation in the Cradle of Humankind

Text and photos by Thor Morales . . Imagine you’re in the cradle of humankind. Cultures similar to yours have thrived in a seemingly barren, rock-strewn desert for thousands of years. But now, once frequently practiced rites, ceremonies, and traditions are losing vigor, and your mother tongue is falling by the wayside as you adopt