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Oldoinyo Sambu

A Maasai man tells the story of his splendid and diverse territory of life in Tanzania. WORDS, IMAGES, AND VIDEO Alois Porokwa   I didn’t know why Ndakaji Leyian was so perplexed when, back in 1978, he asked me where I was studying. Ndakaji is a Maasai Elder, now about eighty years of age. In

Orans in Peril

In Rajasthan, agro-pastoralists defend their sacred landscapes from “green” development. WORDS AND IMAGES Rudrath Avinashi . Orans are sacred landscapes that are conserved by Indigenous and local agropastoral communities in Rajasthan. They mostly encompass arid and semiarid regions of Rajasthan and are now gaining recognition as biodiversity hotspots in the region. Their sacred character stems

Protected by Prayer: Reverence, Respect, and Reciprocity at the Heart of Sacred Natural Sites in the Mediterranean

Greek Orthodox Monastère de Solan in France

Spiritual values are the key to a harmonious relationship with the earth. Liza Zogib and Sandra Spissinger-Bang     Protecting lands, territories, and the gifts of nature has been a human endeavor for millennia. That endeavor still exists, best exemplified by Indigenous Peoples around the globe and by other communities and individuals who maintain an

Voices from the Field: African Rural Women, Custodians of Seed and Traditional Knowledge

Kagole Byarufu

by Kagole Margret Byarufu My name, Kagole, was given to me upon my birth. It initially belonged to my father’s aunt who had died a few months before I was born. She was herself a custodian of the sacred natural site cared for by my family, so the other members of my clan in the

A Blossoming Time at ÁLEṈENEȻ (Homeland): Reclaiming W̱SÁNEĆ (Saanich) Place Names on the West Coast of Canada

biocultural diversity

by Alice Meyers in conversation with Earl Claxton Jr. (Thuh-thay-tun Kapilano) This is the story of my friendship with Earl Claxton Jr., a SȾÁ,UTW̱ (Tsawout) Elder and respected botanical knowledge holder from the W̱SÁNEĆ (Saanich) Coast Salish First Nation on the territory known as Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Anglicized from his SENĆOŦEN language, his

Irony as Inspiration: From Academic Research to Community Action in Protecting Biocultural Landscapes

biocultural diversity

by Kelly Bannister and George Nicholas It is Fall 2014. At the Musqueam Cultural Centre near Vancouver in coastal British Columbia (BC), a meeting is taking place of an international team of cultural heritage scholars, professionals, and Indigenous community experts. The group is holding its final gathering to conclude a seven-year, multimillion-dollar university-based research initiative